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History Of Easy

The first EASY – 54’ Sea Ray Sundancer

The second EASY – 60’ Nassau Pilot House

The third EASY – 64’ Ocean Alexander

The fourth EASY – 72’ Cheoy Lee Pilot House

We are keeping it EASY!

 

Our current boat, the 72’ Cheoy Lee Pilot House, was originally named NorthStar, and was commissioned in 2006. Please see the following article written for one of the Cheoy Lee newsletters by its then Captain, Chris Driver, which describes its commissioning and first voyage:

 

“It sounded like Mission: Impossible. Offload the new 72′ Raised Pilothouse Motor Yacht, Northstar, built at Cheoy Lee’s factory in mainland China, from the freighter at the Port of Seattle. Full dealer commissioning and systems outfitting in just five weeks. Immediately cast-off on a 7,000-mile delivery cruise down the West Coast, through the Panama Canal, up the East Coast and into the Great Lakes.

 

Madness? Well, that was the ambitious schedule for Northstar when she arrived in Seattle in April, 2006. Her final destination would be Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan’s western shore. She was shipped to Seattle in order to take advantage of the first-class yacht outfitting resources available in the Pacific Northwest – and to provide an excuse to put this fine yacht through her paces on the trip of a lifetime.

 

For our small yacht outfitting and delivery company, this was an exciting challenge; a chance to work with an adventuresome repeat client on a quality yacht. But time was of the essence – if we were to make it to the East Coast before the Caribbean hurricane season got into full swing, we would have to leave by the middle of May, leaving us little time to get everything installed and ready for a long offshore trip. But we were confident that the careful planning and detailed specification for the vessel would make it possible. Throughout the build we had been liaising with Cheoy Lee via our project manager on site, Bill Gross of the Seattle-based design firm, Yacht Enterprises. Bill knows Cheoy Lee well and was able to communicate our requirements, translating client requests into practical and elegant solutions. Fortunately, the factory showed such attention to detail in the fit and finish and with all the commercial-grade systems that we had the boat ocean-ready in a very short time. Fully provisioned and stowed, we cast off on May, 16th, just 35 days after the Cheoy Lee 72′ came off the freighter.

 

The rugged Pacific Coast of Washington, Oregon and Northern California can be a tough testing ground. A brand new boat, with the owner and his fiancée on board learning brand new systems, can be even tougher. But the boat passed both tests with flying colors. We arrived in San Diego after two fuel stops in little more than three days.

 

We paused briefly in San Diego for a few service items, oil change and reprovisioning. Then we were off into foreign waters, southbound for Panama. This was exactly what the Cheoy Lee 72′ was built for: Comfortably, safely and efficiently eating up ocean miles en route to exotic locations.

 

In between fuel and customs stops, the C-18 Caterpillar diesels pushed her along effortlessly, covering over 350 miles each day in mostly favorable weather. With the aid of the useful weather-routing services provided by CommandersWeather.com, we made it safely through the Canal and across the Caribbean, arriving back in the U.S. at South Beach, Miami, just 4 weeks after leaving San Diego.

 

Now, we had just a week to run up the Eastern Seaboard to New York. Once we reached the safety of the Hudson River, we were almost home-free. All that was left was to navigate the locks and bridges of the inland waterways and sprint across Lakes Ontario, Erie and Huron and down Lake Michigan, even in time for 4th July in Milwaukee.

 

Well, not so fast. This was the year that rain in the Northeast caused the Erie Canal to flood, closing portions of the canal on the very day that we arrived in Albany, New York. After some delay and a narrow escape in the middle of the night when rising waters caused the Albany Yacht Club docks to disintegrate, we were forced to turn around and return to Manhattan. The only remaining northern route into the Great Lakes left open to us was the Saint Lawrence Seaway in Nova Scotia. This would add an extra 1,800 miles and about two weeks to an already lengthy trip, but at least we would get to visit Montreal.

 

So, it was on July 25th, 2006, rather than the Fourth, that Northstar came around the breakwater into the Milwaukee Yacht Club, proudly flying the flags of the seven nations and 11 states and provinces; the symbols of a trip that had comprised 8,900 nautical miles, 75 days on-board, 43 days under way, countless adventures, very few boat problems and two very happy, very proud new owners of one of the finest, most well-traveled new yachts on the Great Lakes.

History Of Easy

The first EASY – 54’ Sea Ray Sundancer

The second EASY – 60’ Nassau Pilot House

The third EASY – 64’ Ocean Alexander

The fourth EASY – 72’ Cheoy Lee Pilot House

We are keeping it EASY!

Untitled1234

Our current boat, the 72’ Cheoy Lee Pilot House, was originally named NorthStar, and was commissioned in 2006. Please see the following article written for one of the Cheoy Lee newsletters by its then Captain, Chris Driver, which describes its commissioning and first voyage:

 

“It sounded like Mission: Impossible. Offload the new 72′ Raised Pilothouse Motor Yacht, Northstar, built at Cheoy Lee’s factory in mainland China, from the freighter at the Port of Seattle. Full dealer commissioning and systems outfitting in just five weeks. Immediately cast-off on a 7,000-mile delivery cruise down the West Coast, through the Panama Canal, up the East Coast and into the Great Lakes.

 

Madness? Well, that was the ambitious schedule for Northstar when she arrived in Seattle in April, 2006. Her final destination would be Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on Lake Michigan’s western shore. She was shipped to Seattle in order to take advantage of the first-class yacht outfitting resources available in the Pacific Northwest – and to provide an excuse to put this fine yacht through her paces on the trip of a lifetime.

 

For our small yacht outfitting and delivery company, this was an exciting challenge; a chance to work with an adventuresome repeat client on a quality yacht. But time was of the essence – if we were to make it to the East Coast before the Caribbean hurricane season got into full swing, we would have to leave by the middle of May, leaving us little time to get everything installed and ready for a long offshore trip. But we were confident that the careful planning and detailed specification for the vessel would make it possible. Throughout the build we had been liaising with Cheoy Lee via our project manager on site, Bill Gross of the Seattle-based design firm, Yacht Enterprises. Bill knows Cheoy Lee well and was able to communicate our requirements, translating client requests into practical and elegant solutions. Fortunately, the factory showed such attention to detail in the fit and finish and with all the commercial-grade systems that we had the boat ocean-ready in a very short time. Fully provisioned and stowed, we cast off on May, 16th, just 35 days after the Cheoy Lee 72′ came off the freighter.

 

The rugged Pacific Coast of Washington, Oregon and Northern California can be a tough testing ground. A brand new boat, with the owner and his fiancée on board learning brand new systems, can be even tougher. But the boat passed both tests with flying colors. We arrived in San Diego after two fuel stops in little more than three days.

 

We paused briefly in San Diego for a few service items, oil change and reprovisioning. Then we were off into foreign waters, southbound for Panama. This was exactly what the Cheoy Lee 72′ was built for: Comfortably, safely and efficiently eating up ocean miles en route to exotic locations.

 

In between fuel and customs stops, the C-18 Caterpillar diesels pushed her along effortlessly, covering over 350 miles each day in mostly favorable weather. With the aid of the useful weather-routing services provided by CommandersWeather.com, we made it safely through the Canal and across the Caribbean, arriving back in the U.S. at South Beach, Miami, just 4 weeks after leaving San Diego.

 

Now, we had just a week to run up the Eastern Seaboard to New York. Once we reached the safety of the Hudson River, we were almost home-free. All that was left was to navigate the locks and bridges of the inland waterways and sprint across Lakes Ontario, Erie and Huron and down Lake Michigan, even in time for 4th July in Milwaukee.

 

Well, not so fast. This was the year that rain in the Northeast caused the Erie Canal to flood, closing portions of the canal on the very day that we arrived in Albany, New York. After some delay and a narrow escape in the middle of the night when rising waters caused the Albany Yacht Club docks to disintegrate, we were forced to turn around and return to Manhattan. The only remaining northern route into the Great Lakes left open to us was the Saint Lawrence Seaway in Nova Scotia. This would add an extra 1,800 miles and about two weeks to an already lengthy trip, but at least we would get to visit Montreal.

 

So, it was on July 25th, 2006, rather than the Fourth, that Northstar came around the breakwater into the Milwaukee Yacht Club, proudly flying the flags of the seven nations and 11 states and provinces; the symbols of a trip that had comprised 8,900 nautical miles, 75 days on-board, 43 days under way, countless adventures, very few boat problems and two very happy, very proud new owners of one of the finest, most well-traveled new yachts on the Great Lakes.

71 Electronics Crew

The Refit

The transformation from NorthStar to EASY took four months working with our friend John Winters at PipeWelders on the Marina Mile in Fort Lauderdale, Florida from December of 2012 through May of 2013. We updated the Electronics, installed the Hardtop, added a Bait Tank (on the east coast they call this a “Live Well”), removed the carpet and fancy fuzzy furnishings, installed hard floor and bunk house styled covers on the Sofas and Bedding. So much for a luxury yacht, we are now an “all hands on deck” novice friendly, interactive yachting experience.